This contributed to the breadth of Huang-Chang’s vision, Even if they consist of only one rice field, the landscapes in his paintings have an open vista. The pure colours of Hualien must have impinged on Huang’s imagination form his childhood. His particular sensitivity to the green colour of Hualien would shape the highly verdant universe in his paintings later on. Huang Ming-Chang is undoubtedly a natural “son of Hualien ” . Actually, Huang went to college in Taipei and has settled there afterwards. In between, he went to France and studied and studied art for a few years in Paris, the city among cities. Yet interestingly, it seems that he has always remained indifferent to urban civilization. Apart from the Taiwanese countryside, his paintings also show the scenery of Bali in Indonesia, Malaysia and Vietnam. The natural scenery of undeveloped areas in the subtropics and the villages there bears some similarity to those in Taiwan. Paddyfields and banana, palm and coconut trees – everything is green as far as the eye can see. Huang Ming-Chang, the “son of Hualien ” , seems to be constantly replicating the “Arcadia” in his childhood memory. The Southeast Asian landscape in these paintings is nothing but the projection of his profound nostalgia for his native place. This nostalgia stems from his longing and yearning for a utopia-like “ paradise ” .Returning to the original simplicity and purity is a perpetual theme in Huang’s paintings. His works can be described as a “pastoral symphony” celebrating nature.
During the 1980s, Huang’s home in Xindian looked out on a vast expanse of rice field. When spring came, it was all covered in green. It was probably the late rice field in the outskirts of Taipei City. This piece of green land inspired the painter to create the <Gazing Out> series during his transitional period. On a balcony, a figure leans on the railings and gazes out on a rice field that stretches to the foot of the hills faraway. The paunter seemed to have a foreboding that this green land on
Several decades ago,I first Hualien on my trip around the island after graduating from junior high school.
Later,I revisited it a few times.
What struck me the most in Hualien was its colours.
Thanks to its unpolluted air,everything there has a crystalline clarity,including the odean,the paddyfields and the hills.
The woods on the hills are of a glowing green,as if washed by clear,a shining and dazzling green.
Over the years,other areas in Taiwan have been successively developed,and some have become unrecognizable.
Being difficult of access,only Hualien has managed to preserve its natural landscape,and remained the last piece of pristine land in Taiwan.
the painter Huang Ming-Chang was born in a village in Ruisui Township,Hualien.
According to him,it is like a kind of Arcadia.
He spent his carefree childhood and adolescence running wild in the mpuntains and the fields.
The unique landscapes of Hualien must have had a profound influence on the painter,and are probbly the original source of his later creations.
Facing the sea with mountains as its backdrop,Hualien commands a sweeping view of the Pacific Ocean.
This contributed to the breadth of Huang-Chang’s vision, Even if they consist of only one rice field, the landscapes in his paintings have an open vista. The pure colours of Hualien must have impinged on Huang’s imagination form his childhood. His particular sensitivity to the green colour of Hualien would shape the highly verdant universe in his paintings later on. Huang Ming-Chang is undoubtedly a natural “son of Hualien ” . Actually, Huang went to college in Taipei and has settled there afterwards. In between, he went to France and studied and studied art for a few years in Paris, the city among cities. Yet interestingly, it seems that he has always remained indifferent to urban civilization. Apart from the Taiwanese countryside, his paintings also show the scenery of Bali in Indonesia, Malaysia and Vietnam. The natural scenery of undeveloped areas in the subtropics and the villages there bears some similarity to those in Taiwan. Paddyfields and banana, palm and coconut trees – everything is green as far as the eye can see. Huang Ming-Chang, the “son of Hualien ” , seems to be constantly replicating the “Arcadia” in his childhood memory. The Southeast Asian landscape in these paintings is nothing but the projection of his profound nostalgia for his native place. This nostalgia stems from his longing and yearning for a utopia-like “ paradise ” .Returning to the original simplicity and purity is a perpetual theme in Huang’s paintings. His works can be described as a “pastoral symphony” celebrating nature.

During the 1980s, Huang’s home in Xindian looked out on a vast expanse of rice field. When spring came, it was all covered in green. It was probably the late rice field in the outskirts of Taipei City. This piece of green land inspired the painter to create the <Gazing Out> series during his transitional period. On a balcony, a figure leans on the railings and gazes out on a rice field that stretches to the foot of the hills faraway. The paunter seemed to have a foreboding that this green land on.